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CHOOSING A SHAPE

The most traditional shape is the round brilliant diamond. This is the choice of many and the first image that comes to mind when diamonds and diamond rings come to mind.

Only the masterful skill of the diamond cutter can attempt the transformation that the raw diamond crystal goes through. From raw material to incredible and unique.

Round Brilliant

Round Brilliant

This is the shape that has set the traditional standard for all diamond shapes. Over 75% of the diamonds sold today are Round Brilliant. Its 58-facet cut, divided among its crown (top), girdle (widest part) and pavilion (base), is calibrated through a precise formula to achieve the maximum in fire and brilliance.

Fancy Cut Diamonds

Oval

Oval — This is a symmetrical design which is even and appeals to many small handed women seemingly elongating hands and fingers.

Marquise

Marquise — This shape is elongated with pointed ends. The smile of the Marquise de Pompadour inspired this shape which was then commissioned by the Sun King, France's Louis XIV, who wanted a diamond to match it. It is beautiful as a solitaire or when matched with smaller complimentary diamonds.

Pear

Pear — This cut combines the oval and marquise shapes. It is the hybrid shape that looks like a sparkling teardrop. It beautifully compliments the average size hand and fingers. It is gorgeous for pendants and earrings.

Heart

Heart — A pear shaped diamond with a cleft on the top. The extraordinary skill of the cutter determines the beauty of this cut. Look for a stone with an even shape and a well-defined outline.

Emerald

Emerald — This shape is known as a step cut because its concentric broad, flat planes resemble stair steps. A rectangular shape with cut corners. Inclusions and inferior color can be more pronounced in this particular cut. So clarity and color should be looked at carefully and time taken when a choice is made.

Princess

Princess — This is a square or rectangular shape with many facets. This is a relatively new cut and often finds its way into solitaire engagement rings. It is attractive with longer fingers. This cut requires more weight to be directed toward the diamond's depth in order to maximize brilliance. Depth percentages of 70% to 78% are common.

Trilliant

Trilliant — This is the spectacular wedge shape. This was first designed in Amsterdam. This design can vary depending on a particular diamond's natural characteristics and the cutter's personal preferences. The shape may look like a traditional triangle with pointed corners, but more rounded shapes can be found.

Radiant

Radiant — This is a square or rectangular shape. The elegance of the emerald and the brilliance of the round shape marks this cut. 70 facets maximize the effect of its color refraction. Depth percentages of 70% to 78% are common.

Cushion Cut

Cushion Cut — Late 19th and early 20th style antique type shape. Remnants of the "Old Mine Cut", a deep cut with large facets.

Asscher Cut

Asscher Cut — This cut was made popular in the 1920's by the Asscher Diamond Company in Amsterdam. Its art deco feeling was very popular at the time. The company went out of business during the Depression and Asscher cuts disappeared from the market. Recently this shape has come back into style.

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